Promising Practices

Leadership & Collective Action

For gender justice to be sustainable, women need to be represented and to have voice and influence within public and political life and decision-making. This set of approaches works to build the leadership and collective strength of women and marginalized groups to increase their influence within political decision-making processes, whether as private citizens, civic activists or elected officials. Networking of diverse groups with an interest in political and social change and facilitating broad-based coalitions and movements is central to this approach.

Women’s Leadership and Networking

Women’s leadership and networking in civic associations and popular social movements approaches seek to reform policies, laws, regulations and institutional practices that discriminate against women and prevent women’s access to equal rights, opportunities and resources. They also seek to help organize and catalyze collective action, develop the capacity of women leaders and organization, and amplify women’s voices and strategic action in order to increase women’s access to policy and decision-making process, In many cases, groups are more able to influence public and political decisions about rights and resources when they work together, and particularly in diverse alliances that bridge women from different geographic areas, classes, ethnicity and other identity groups. These approaches increase women’s collective strength and influence by helping them to network, either horizontally and/or vertically.

In this section you will find:

  • CARE: Women Lead in Emergencies (Global)
  • CARE: Learning for change (East Africa Region)
  • CARE: Great Lakes Advocacy Initiative (Multi-country)
  • GROOTS Kenya: Women in self-help groups (Kenya)
  • National Commission to Stop Violence against Women: The Women-Headed Families Empowerment Program (Indonesia)
  • AHCV/AMAV: Men engaging program (Nicaragua)
  • CARE and Domestic Worker Syndicates (Multi-country)

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Strengthening Women in Electoral Politics

In addition to organizing, mobilization and participation in social accountability processes, women can also influence public and political decision-making from inside government, as elected representatives or civic servants. Women’s representation in public bodies is a human right and, in most countries, a statutory right, and is also essential to ensure that public decision-making, policy and service reflect the women’s diverse experiences, needs and interests.

In this section you will find:

  • CARE: Women’s Empowerment Programme (Niger)
  • Rupantar: Grassroots Women’s Leadership (Bangladesh)

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Supporting Women’s Action in Value Chains

Linked to women’s economic empowerment, one strand of work has focused on supporting women’s skills and collective power and linkages for enhancing livelihoods. These approaches have helped to enhance women’s economic participation and to increase the value secured by participating in economic roles, including strengthening their resilience and capacity to cope during crises, as well as women’s engagement and leadership in community issues.

In this section you will find:

  • Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture: Smallholder Horticulture Empowerment (Kenya)
  • Oxfam: Gender Action Learning Systems (Uganda)
  • CARE: Souqona (Palestine)

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Cross-Agency Consortia for Advancing Rights

CARE: Child Nutrition Initiative (Peru)

In Peru, CARE played a lead role in creating and facilitating the Child Nutrition Initiative (CNI) to combat child malnutrition. CNI brought together 16 organizations – spanning donors, NGOs, UN agencies and research institutions – to advocate for nutrition to be central to the Peruvian government’s commitment to fight poverty.[1]

In this section, you will find what the evidence indicates from CARE: Child Nutrition Initiative (Peru)

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